Appreciate A Police Officer Today

Ms. Fatuma Ngwena is an intern at IPOA on a Government Programme

Too often, the hard and dangerous work that our National Police Service officers do, goes unnoticed or at least unrecognised.

Most people think that the police are always on the wrong, citing police misconduct, always condemning the police and pointing fingers at the law enforcement agencies.

There are a lot of reasons to thank our local police officers for, they make sacrifices for our own safety on a daily basis.

They spend months away from their loved ones, and stay up all night in the cold during night patrols.

Say thank you or show some appreciation next time you see a police officer. A little respect goes a long way, and we should always remember that they too are human beings.

The appreciation should come from both the government and the common citizen. It is sad to read reports that always depict police officers living a sub-standard lifestyle.

A recent report by the Independent Policing Oversight Authority exposes the dilapidated residential quarters and battered offices, among others at police stations in Kenya.

How do you expect a police officer to serve you diligently when despite meagre pay, he sleeps under a leaking roof, allocated to more than one officer and their families?

Working environment plays a big role in the quality of service our police officers offer Kenyans.

A report by Nation.Africa stated that the government has set aside Sh200 million to cushion police officers who exhaust their National Hospital Insurance Fund cover.

That is commendable and should be put into action and not just words.

It should not be news when a citizen helps or appreciates a police officer but this is a sad reality in our society today.

Barely a year ago, a video captured on a mobile phone became a social media sensation, why? It showed a woman serving a delicious meal she had prepared at her home to officers who were manning a roadblock, in execution of orders meant to combat spread of Covid-19.

This should be an ordinary gesture of gratitude and appreciation to our officers in blue rather than an occurence to behold.

When there is peaceful co-existence between the police and the public, we will have a swift law enforcement system and as time goes by, we will get over the tradition of pointing fingers at the National Police Service.

The root of all goodness lies in the soil of appreciation.